13 Oct '11, 12am

Ai Weiwei world's most important art figure

LONDON: Dissident Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, who hit the headlines during his 81-day detention by Chinese authorities, was on Thursday named as the world's most powerful art figure by influential magazine Art Review. Ai, who was released in June after being imprisoned for "economic crimes", tops the London-based publication's annual "power 100 list" ahead of Hans-Ulrich Obrist and Julia Peyton-Jones, curators of London's Serpentine Gallery. Mark Rappolt, the magazine's editor, said that Ai "had reminded the art world of its wider political role, as an agent of protest outside the sometimes inward-looking domain of galleries and museums. "His activism has been a reminder of how art can reach out to a bigger audience and connect with the real world," he added. "Institutions, while they are really important, can be great tombs." Police accused Ai of tax evasion and the governm...

Full article: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/stories/afp_asiapacific/vi...

Tweets

Taiwan to host Ai Weiwei's art

Taiwan to host Ai Weiwei's art

channelnewsasia.com 23 Oct '11, 6am

TAIPEI: A Taiwanese museum is due to stage an exhibition of the work of Ai Weiwei, an event the prominent Chinese artist a...

This brings new meaning to "nail art": - you guys have got to see some of this artwork!

This brings new meaning to "nail art": - you gu...

michellephan.com 14 Oct '11, 3pm

Bringing new meaning to “nail art,” a nail art exhibition took place in London a couple weeks ago. I was unable to attend ...

the art of delivery, the science of survival

the art of delivery, the science of survival

deluxeduck.livejournal.com 11 Oct '11, 8am

the art of delivery, the science of survival deluxeduck October 11th, 17:05 Current Mood: amazed these beautiful images ar...

Unstealthed: How Important is Stealth in a Greentech Startup?: Guy Kawasaki has a rule of thumb: "The more a

Unstealthed: How Important is Stealth in a Gree...

greentechmedia.com 11 Oct '11, 4pm

Guy Kawasaki has a rule of thumb: "The more a company believes they must be secretive, the less they have." Eric Ries says...