28 Jan '13, 5pm

So true - Video: Three pitfalls startup founders must avoid via @sharethis

Video: Three pitfalls startup founders must avoid June 12, 2012 by SGE Noam Wasserman, Harvard Business School professor and author of The Founder’s Dilemma (see book review ), outlines three pitfalls startup founders must avoid. He talks about the three Rs: relationship decisions, roles decisions, and rewards decisions. Relationship decisions touch on who you co-found a company with, roles decisions involves assigning titles and roles within a team. Finally, reward decisions are about how to split equity. Find out more about SGE’s research arm: SGE Insights , providing customized in-depth research reports to help you navigate the business of technology in Asia. Filed under Toolkit Tags: harvard business school , Noam Wasserman , videos About The Author SGE - (SGE) Covering the Singapore and Southeast Asia startup and entrepreneurship scene since 2005. Read other posts by ...

Full article: http://sgentrepreneurs.com/2012/06/12/three-pitfalls-star...

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